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Joining together individuals who share a common interest in breeding Carduelan species in captivity


Updated Monday, 09 June 2008

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Ornithological Convention at
Porto Alegre

I apologise for being a little late with bringing you the news of this important Brazilian event at Porto Alegre. Just a few lines to congratulate staff for hosting a fabulous conference last month. Although I wasn’t there I was particularly impressed by the feedback from people who attended the convention saying that the program and the list of impressive array of local and international speakers really exceeded their expectations, also the beauty of the city and the hospitality of the vibrant community of Porto Alegre. As you can see below the major topics of discussion was the environment and the ecological impact caused by the eolic energy fields located in the birds migratory corridor. The news on the latest achievements with Lear’s and Spinks Macaws as always was an interesting topic. As for finches, Chestnut Seedeater - (Sporophila cinnamomea), as well as the house Sparrows were discussed, and yes, those who hoped to catch lectures on finches and small Softbills were disappointed again. Brazil has many threatened/near threatened or endangered Finch and Softbill species: Forbes's Blackbird (Curaeus forbesi), Buffy-fronted Seedeater (Sporophila frontalis),  Temminck's Seedeater (Sporophila falcirostris),  Coal-crested Finch (Charitospiza eucosma) often referred to as Pigmy Cardinal, Pale-throated Sierra-Finch (Embernagra longicauda) and how could I not mention the Yarrell's Siskins, Cone-billed Tanagers and the Cherry-throated Tanager, these are just a few names to keep us on toes! Small number of lectures were cancelled due to the late cancellation by speakers that could not make it there for whatever reason. Sorry I do not have many photos to show you but what I've received here they are!  

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The main exhibition hall

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The Museum in Porto Alegre

PROGRAM

PLENARY SESSION 1(English)
UNDERSTANDING THE ORIGINS AND EVOLUTION OF THE SOUTH AMERICAN AVIFAUNA.
Dr. Joel Cracraft - American Museum of Natural History 

PLENARY
SESSION 2
(Portuguese) ANATOMY IN THE CURRENT CONTEXT Of  ORNITHOLOGY Dr. Elizabeth Höfling - Department of Zoology, Institute of Biociências, University of São Paulo

PLENARY SESSION  3 (SPANISH) ECOTOXICOLOGIC MONITORING OF PESTICIDES ON BIRDS IN THE AGROECOSYSTEMS: PROCEDURES AND TOOLS.  . Dr. Maria Elena Zaccagnini - Institute of Biological Resources, INTA-CIRN-CNIA, Argentina.

PLENARY SESSION  4 (English)
CONSERVING BIRDS IN HUMAN-DOMINATED LANDSCAPES
Dr. Jonh Marzluff - University of Washington

PLENARY SESSION  5 (English)
BIOGEOGRAPHY AND SPECIATION OF SOUTH AMERICAN BIRDS.
Dr. Jon Fjeldså - UNMSN


THEMATIC LECTURES


LECTURE 1
UNMASKING SOCIAL SYSTEMS AND  OF PAIRING  OF  BIRDS THROUGH MULTIPLE TOOLS OF STUDY Dr. Regina H.F. Macedo - Department of Zoology - IB, University of Brasilia

LECTURE  2 (Spanish)
LESSONS DERIVED FROM MONITORING POPULATION TENDENCIES OF BLACK NECK SWANS (Cygnus melancoryphus) AND ABUNDANCE OF OTHER AQUATIC BIRDS IN SANCTUARY OF NATURE AFFECTED BY POLLUTING AGENTS OF A PLANT OF PULP OF PAPER IN THE SOUTH OF CHILE. Dr Robert P. Schlatter - Institute of Zoology, Faculty of Sciences, Austral University of Chile

LECTURE 3
ESTIMATE OF  WEALTH OF SPECIES OF BIRDS BY THE METHOD OF LISTS OF MACKINNON Dr. Rômulo Ribon, Department of Biologic Sciences -ICEB , Federal University of Ouro Preto, Ouro Preto-MG.
(Ouro Preto is the name of an important historical city in the State of Minas Gerais where the last years 2006 Brazilian Ornithological Convention was held)


LECTURE 4
THE USE Of  GENETICS IN STUDIES OF EVOLUTION, BIOGEOGRAPHY AND CONSERVATION OF BIRDS. Dra. Cristina Yumi Miyaki - Department of Genetics and Evolution Biology, Institute of Biosciencies, University of São Paulo

LECTURE 5 (English)
BIRDS ON THE BRINK: THE ROAD TO RECOVERY IN THE BUNTINE-MARCHAGEE CATCHMENT OF THE WESTERN AUSTRALIAN WHEAT BELT.
Dr Andrew Huggett, InSight Ecology, Australia

LECTURE 6
INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGIES FOR THE STUDY OF ECOLOGY OF THE SEA AND TERRESTRIAL BIRDS:  TRANSMITTERS BY  SATELLITE,  LANDMARKERS AND STEADY  ISOTOPES. MSc. Leandro Bugoni. University of Glasgow, Division of Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, Albatroz Project

LECTURE 7
IMPORTANCE AND STRATEGIES FOR THE CONSERVATION Of BIODIVERSITY OUT  Of THE PROTECTED  AREAS Dr. Demétrio Luis Guadagnin - PPG-Biology, UNISINOS.


LECTURE 8
MIGRATORY BIRDS AND BIRD  INFLUENZA  IN  BRAZIL Dr. Severino Mendes de Azevedo Júnior -     Farming  Federal University of Pernambuco


LECTURE 9
CHANGING OF ASPECTS OF THE NATURAL FIELDS Of  PARANÁ AND  ITS INFLUENCE ON THE AVIFAUNA. MSc. Eduardo Carrano - Prof. Course of Biology PUCPR. Laboratory of Ecology and Ambient Education.

LECTURE10 (Spanish) 
THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF THE GREAT AND SMALL FISHERIES ON THE POPULATIONS OF HUMBOLDT'S PINGUINS (Spheniscus humboldti) IN PERU Dr Arming Valdez - Unit of Biologia of the Conservation - Peruvian University Cayetano Heredia, Lima

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   One of the locals

SYMPOSIUM 1. TO RECOGNIZE AND TO REPRESENT THE DIVERSITY: MOLECULAR SYSTEMATICS: AND STANDARDS OF DIVERSIFICATION IN NEOTROPICAL BIRDS. Coordinator: Dra. Camila Cherem Ribas (AMNH and USP)

Representing nature: species, speciation, and classification.Dr. Joel Cracraft (AMNH) - Discovering new táxons using molecular evidences in Scytalopus and Thalasseus. Dr. Sandro Bonatto (PUCRS) - Systematic molecular and standards of diversification of the Pyriglena Sort (Thamnophilidae). Msc. Maldonado-Coelho Landmarks (University of Missouri, St. Louis) - Systematic molecular, sampling and the perception of the standards of diversification in some groups of Neotropical birds. Dra. Camila Cherem Ribas (AMNH and USP) - the Advances in the studies of systematics and its Influence in the conservation of the neotropical birds. Dr. Peter Develey (BirdLife International/SAVE Brazil)

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SYMPOSIUM 2. NEOTROPICAL CENSUSES OF AQUATIC BIRDS: EVALUATION OF ITS IMPORTANCE FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF HUMID AREAS AS HÁBITATS OF AQUATIC BIRDS. Coordinator: Msc. João Oldair Menegheti (UFRGS) - Neotropical Censuses of Aquatic-Brazil Birds: 2004 evaluation the 2006. Msc. João Oldair Menegheti (UFRGS) - Evaluation of the results gotten with the CNAAs effected in the region center-west of Brazil. Gislaine Disconzi - the experience of ten years of CNAAs (1990-1999): instrument for the conservation and the handling of the wild life. Bernabé López-Lanús - Wetlands International - Ten years of CNAAs (1990-1999) in Chile: expressive results. Dr. Robert Schlatter - Austral University of Chile

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Doesn't it look like the North American Robin?

SYMPOSIUM 3. CONSERVATION OF THE BIRDS Of PAMPAS I – WHAT WE KNOW (AND WHAT WE DO NOT KNOW) ABOUT BUSHLAND BIRDS IN THE SOUTH EXTREMITY Of BRAZIL. Coordinator: MSc. Rafael Antunes Days (UCPel) – Bushland  Landscapes of the south extremity of Brazil and its birds. MSc. Glayson the Bencke (Zoobotanic  Foundation of Rio Grande do Sul) – Dirty as the fight of pigs:It is  the situation of the threatened birds of Pampas. MSc. Rafael the Days (Catholic University of Pelotas) - the birds in the Brazil-Uruguay border: threatened and/or unknown? Dra. Carla S. Fontana (Pontifical  Catholic University of  Rio Grande do Sul) - Between the cross and the sword: challenges for the conservation of birds in the southwest of the RS. MSc. Iury the Accordi (Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul)  (Emberizidae)Chestnut Seedeater - Sporophila cinnamomea in the native fields of  Rio Grande do Sul: ecology and identification of priority areas for conservation. Dra. Marilise M. Krügel (Center of Superior Education North of Rio Grande do Sul - UFSM)

 

SYMPOSIUM 4. ECOLOGY OF NEOTROPICAL JAYS  AND MIGRATORY BIRDS FROM THE ARTIC: A PRELIMINARY COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS. Coordinator: Dr. Luiz dos Anjos - State University of Native of London - Introduction on the Corvidae family. Dr. Luiz of the Angels - State University of Native of London - Ecology of Cyanocorax caeruleus, C. cyanomelas and C. cristatellus. Dr. Luiz dos Anjos - State University of Native of London - Ecology of Cyanocorax chrysops. Dra. Angélica Kazue Uejima - Federal University of Pernambuco - Ecology of Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus. Dr. John Marzluf - University of Washington

 

SYMPOSIUM 5. CONSERVATION OF THE BIRDS OF PAMPAS II - ACTION STRATEGIES. Coordinator: Dr. Peter Develey Blacksmith (BirdLife International/SAVE Brazil) - the challenge to integrate the productive sector with the conservation of biodiversity in Pampas. Dr. Peter Develey Blacksmith (BirdLife International/SAVE Brazil) - the representation of the Units of Conservation for the protection of the birds of Pampas. MSc. Jan Karel F. Mähler Jr (PPG Ecology UFRGS/ ONG Curicaca) - the strategy of the IBAMA for the conservation of the Passeriformes of Pampas. MSc. Leonardo Mohr (IBAMA) - Conservation of Pampas of  Mercosul - a challenge for four countries. Dr. Anibal Parera - BirdLife International (General Coordinator of Pasture Project) - the sustainable production and the preservation of Pampas. Mr. Fernando Adauto - (Farsul/Apropampa). (Pampas is the typical vegetation of Rio Grande do Sul – that is a plain bushland where weeds grow in abundance).

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SYMPOSIUM 6. PRIVATE ARCHIVES: WHAT  DO PARASITES  TEACH US ON THE ECOLOGY AND ON THE BEHAVIOR OF BIRDS? Coordinator: Dra Cláudia Calegaro-Marques (UFRGS) - the importance of worm fauna in the studies of biodiversity. Dra. Suzana Bencke Amato (UFRGS) – Do Cormorants feed only on fish? MSc. Cassandra Moraes Hunter (UFRGS) –Worms as indicators of preys consumed by  Turdus rufiventris and Passer domesticus in an urban-agricultural gradient. Dra. Cláudia Calegaro-Marques (UFRGS) - Parasites: friends or enemies? Dr. Jose Philip Ribeiro Amato (UFRGS)

 

SYMPOSIUM 7. AEOLIAN BIRDS  AND PARKS IN BRAZIL - CHANCES AND RISKS. Coordinator: MSc.Jan Karel Felix Mähler Junior - PPG in Ecology, UFRGS/ ONG Curicaca - Aeolian Energy - current situation and perspectives for  Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. MSc. Eberson Jose Thimming Silveira - Secretariat of Science and Technology of RS/ PUCRS. - Evaluation of the risk of aeolian enterprises to avifauna as instrument for the ambient licensing. MSc. João Carlos P. Dotto - FEPAM - Importance of  monitoring of birds in distinct stages of the Integral Aeolian Exploitation of Osório, Rio Grande do Sul , MSc. Jan Karel Felix Mähler Junior - PPG in Ecology, UFRGS/ ONG Curicaca – Monitoring of birds in aeolian park in the coastal zone of Rio Grande do Sul,  MSc. Iury Almeida Accordi - UFRGS - Survey and monitoring of birds in aeolian parks of Santa Catarina. MSc. Marcos  Antonio Guimarães de Azevedo



BELLAVISTA  CLOUD FOREST RESERVE

Bellavista Reserve is located at 0 00'46" latitude in the cloud forest of northwest Ecuador,on the edge of Choco bio-region, among the most divers places in the world. The expending 600 hectare (1,500 acres) reserve is formed by sharp and deeply forested mountains descending to gorges with rushing waterfalls and crystalline streams, and the views stretch far away to distant volcanos. Only two hours from Quito, Bellavista is the perfect place for relaxation, and for discovery of the cloud forest,its birds and its diversity of plant life. Bellavista Reserve is directly associated with the Fundacion Siempre Bosque, a conservation of cloud forests in, but not limited to, the Western Andes of Ecuador, for educational scientific,and recreational purposes. The goal of Bellavista Reserve is to educate the public on the significance of biodiversity in tropical cloud forests and the ever increasing importance of the forest's protection. Bellavista represents pre-montane cloud forest, with en elevation range between about 1400 to 2600 meters above sea level, and has an average mean temperature of 14-22 degrees C. These forests have the highest diversity anywhere of epiphytes (plants that grow on other plants) so the trees are festooned with hanging gardens a profusion of bromeliads, orchids, mosses and more. Because of the steep slopes, light penetrating the forest floor allows a veritable jungle to develop. You'll find yourself in an enchanted forest, with a profusion of life awaiting discovery. Bellavista has an astounding number of botanical  treasures: bromeliads, orchids, and fascinating families such as Gesneraceae, and Melastomataceae; there are always flowers in bloom in this subtropical environment. A world of fascination - the adaptation to this special environment are too many to list.
Within theis magical place of mist and mystery, Bellavista has 170 recorded species of birds and this list continues to grow ! Tanager - finch, Giant Antpitta, Swallow-tailed Nightjar, Plush - capped Finch, Beautiful Jay and the White - faced Nunbird are all found here, and everybody enthuses over the brightly coloured Tanagers and Plate -billed Mountain - Toucan ! Simply sit in a four - story dome and admire the multitude of hummingbirds visiting feeders in a flurry of activity. Mammals include the endangered Spectacle Bear, rarely seen but protected by the reserve; mountain lion, Andian coati, Tayra and many others.

www.ecuadorexplorer.com/bellavista/home  
www.alink.net/~jimd/bellavista.html


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http://www.camacdonald.com/birding/DesJardin/index.htm


GREEN CARDINALS
(Gubernatrix cristata)


By: Pol  Jamers

E: Green Cardinals                 F: Cardinal vert
G: Grun kardinal                  N:Groene kardinal

The Green Cardinal was discovered in 1815 by J.Vieilot who has named it Gubernatrix cristata. These beautiful birds are very easy to care for in captivity. During the non-breeding period they can be kept with other birds and will even tolerate birds of their own kind (and other species of Cardinals), but unfortunately this is not the case during their breeding season. Two pairs of Cardinals in one aviary is a recipe for disaster. They are fierce fighters and  they will fight until one bird dies but often both birds will die from injury. Other related species like the Saltators, Blue Bishops, or finches like the Buntings and Grosbeaks, should also be avoided.

In captivity, Cardinals can be kept in an outdoor aviary even in  winter, providing a draft free indoor shelter is available. Of all of the Cardinal species Red Cardinals are the best songsters but when it comes to breeding in captivity Green Cardinals are the best. Other Cardinals which are more difficult to breed in captivity can be fostered out to them. I breed my birds in aviaries 1m wide x 2m deep x2m high. The female builds a large cup-shaped nest, lays 3 - 5 greenish-blue eggs with brown or black stripes and incubates the eggs for approximately 13 - 14 days. Once the eggs are hatched one should never be too inquisitive as they could desert the nest. The best time to ring the young is in their fifth day. I use G1 = 3.5mm closed band and I always do this in the late afternoon when the parents are less active. The young leave the nest after 14 - 16 days and are fed by their parents for another 3 - 4 weeks. I separate the young after 6 weeks. A variety of live food, fruit, green and soft food should be made available. Clean water is a must and it should be changed frequently as these birds like to bathe often.

Diet:

Green Cardinals will eat anything; fruits, insects, dry seed mix, half-ripe grass and millet seeds, green and cooked vegetables, cat or dog food, egg & biscuits but do not feed earth worms!!! I also have my own recipe: I get some egg-food, (bought or home made) and mix it with some skimmed milk curd cheese, to which I add a spoon of vinegar. This is very healthy. I feed this to my birds while they care for young in the nest. I prepare enough to last me for a few days and I keep it in a freezer. If you wish you could add some insects before feeding.


Red Siskins

No one really knows how many pairs of Red Siskins still exist in the wild. Some reports say 600 pairs others say 300, and some suggest there could be less than 50 individuals. But there is one thing for certain they are very, very rare in the wild. Continuous trapping for sale as Songbirds, habitat loss due to deforestation and the continuous expansion of human habitation has taken its toll. I am not going to continue with this as most of you Siskin breeders have read reports like this over and over again. The reason I am writing this is that I have received several inquiries asking about Red Siskins mutation. Most of the Red Siskins mutation which I have seen, were white, yellow or fawn, but I cannot understand how anyone could engage in developing of mutations, knowing that the pure Red Siskins as found in the wild are so rare in Aviculture as well as in the wild. Furthermore, none of these mutations could match the beauty of the pure Red Siskins. The second most frequently asked question is; How to breed Red Siskins? For those hobbyists who are planning to obtain a pair for breeding, they need a small aviary of their own. I have never bred Siskins in cabinets, so I cannot comment on this. If you can, build yourself a small garden aviary in which you can grow seeding plants and flowers as a hobby, and introduce only one pair of Siskins. Remember birds such as Zebras or other Grass Finches will dominate in any aviary, so it is best to exclude them. Red Siskins will not tolerate any disturbances of their nest by other birds and are easily discouraged from breeding. The nest cup should be hung as high as possible and camouflaged with some shade cloth and/or artificial vine.

Make sure that all the plants in the aviary are non-toxic. For nesting material I provide coconut and hessian fibers and some cotton wool.

DIET

When I walk into my Siskins aviary and see the birds all fluffed up I know what the problem is; there is no Sunflower or Niger seed left in the dish, although there may be plenty of other seed. Siskins and Goldfinches don't do well on seed mix only, they must have Sunflower and Niger seed available at all times. I cannot emphasis the importance of feeding Sunflower and Niger seed to Goldfinches and Siskins.

I provide a small dish of seed mix, one small dish of Niger and a handful of unhulled sunflower seeds, daily (per pair, per aviary). Although many recommend soft food, they are probably right, but I have always been very cautious about this. Due to my work commitments, I can only clean and refill the dishes daily. But during the rainy days this is not good enough. The soft food spoils easily and fungi can often be seen growing on it. The best I could offer was half a biscuit per pair, daily. Recently I met a breeder who had an interesting recipe. He boils a cup of seed mix, adds a cup of Roudybush, a cup of egg and biscuit (which totally absorbs the moisture), to which he also adds vitamins. I have been using his recipe and it works well. My birds simply relish this and always empty the dish by the end of the day. We all have our own secret recipes, but for those of you who are unsure of preparing soft food mix, the basic ingredients are protein, vitamins and energy. Protein is commercially sold in supermarkets as High Protein Baby Cereal or just as Natural Protein Powder, your favourite vitamins and glucose powder for energy, to which you can add your own preferred 'secret' ingredients. I also provide one lettuce leaf everyday of the year. Whenever available, green seeding millets and grasses are also fed. Cuttlefish bone and baked eggshells with some grit is a must, and is always available.

WATER

I once had three young Madagascar Weavers in the nest and was proud of my achievement to see all three of them progressing so well (Madagascar Weavers lay three eggs per clutch), only to come home from work one day to find two of them had drowned in the water dish. As a precaution I now only half fill the dish, or place a flat stone in it when the young are about to leave the nest. Keeping the water dishes clean and filled daily will prevent parasites and diseases from being transmitted. Dissolved faeces release bacteria and parasites eggs (which float in water), will easily infect other birds. I have been breeding finches for twenty years and I have never had any problems with parasites or diseases. I de-worm my birds twice a year and treat them for coccidia, often during the cold and wet winter months. I also add vitamins and minerals to the water during the breeding season but discontinue after the young have hatched to prevent any bacteria growth during the hot summer months. My personal opinion is, vitamins and minerals are better given with soft food, and water always given pure.


NEUDROSSENFELD 1998 ICC SHOW

The 1998 Carduelan specie Bird Show in Neudrossenfeld (near Bayrouth, Germany), was another one of the many attributes of the International Carduelan Club of Germany. Close to a thousand people visited the show, with many familiar faces whom I recognized from last time I was there in 1996. There were many local breeders and many interstate breeders who traveled kilometres just for the show. The best and the only Caurdal Show also drew breeders from many countries all over the world. Approximately 120 species and subspecies were shown. Some species were displayed in cages and others in large aviaries. This year the focus was on the larger finches like the species and subspecies of Bullfinches, Grosbeaks, Crossbills, etc. During the two days of exhibition, excellent German food was available and the beer was flowing non-stop. Ideas, experiences and opinions on the Birds were the main point of discussions at the tables. An excellent talk and slide show on Grosbeaks was presented by a well-known Grosbeak breeder in Germany; Mr. Egon Schweers. A video on gathering wild seeding grasses and bird feeding was also shown and was available to purchase. All kinds of soft food, special seed mixes for particular species, aviary equipment, souveniers and publications were also available for purchase. The Show was held at the local Poultry Club, with plenty of parking available.. The hotel where we were staying was only a short distance from the show. The rooms were excellent, ranging from $80 to $200. It was interesting talking to breeders who only specialized with specific species of birds. Some of them were so successful they were the only individuals in Europe who owned some of the rare or difficult to breed birds in captivity - the Lawrence’s Goldfinch, Yarrell’s Siskins, Large Yellow-bellied Siskins, etc. Rare, or not often seen birds like the Oriole Finches (Linurgus olivaceous) , and the Syrian Serins (Serinus syriacus), were also shown. The sight of the rare and beautiful Scarlet Finches (Haematospiza sipahi) from the Himalayas, were an occasion to remember. In conclusion, I would like to thank the ICC president, Joerg and wife Ester Nitschky Germann for inviting me, Siskin breeders Marcus Domes, Ruedigar and his family, John Verhiel, Jean Meertens and Jurgen Franz. And how could I forget Claudia Krobb and Roger.

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Joerg Nitschky speaking at the opening

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JJoerg, Roger and Claudia


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And guess who this is


Some good information on air sac mites can be found at the following
>URLs:

      http://www.geocities.com/~NFSSnet/airsack-mite.html>>>
http://www.geocities.com/~NFSSnet/airsack-mite2.html
See Air Sac Mite Article   at  vetafarm@vetafarm.com.au
Also see
http://www.onelist.com/subscribe.cgi/Carduelan_finches

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